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Posts from the ‘other people’s houses’ Category

I just found this outtake from Other People’s Houses. I can’t believe a year ago I was planning the exhibition.

It reminded me of how many of you expressed interest in collaborating with me last year. I haven’t forgotten about you, I promise. But it turns out my brain’s only equipped to do one thing at a time and when I’m not working, I’m struggling to write the second draft of the novel. I’m struggling to work out what on earth I’m doing with my life. Hell, I can barely even decide what to wear in the morning.

I’ll be in touch with you all when things are simpler, clearer.



I’m putting together a new photography collaboration. It’s about the things that make us who we are.

It’ll be like Other People’s Houses and the 1010 Project but this time it’s open to everyone.

If you want to get involved,  email me (even if you have in the past (sorry)).

[photos by Thomas van der Zaag, Kaleb Marshall, Mary Robinson]




The Other People’s Houses site is finally live. You can see 10 photos from each of the contributing photographers.

I’m trying to work out what to do next.

OPH







Anabela’s photos of the opening of OPH have made my heart swell. I’m not sure I’ve ever felt so proud.

OPH

I just wanted to say a huge thank you to everyone who came down to the opening night of OPH on Thursday. I had such an amazing night and it was so nice to meet some of you.

I need to give special mentions to my friend Steve who took the above two photos, gave the show an identity and designed everything from the bio sheets to the name plates under each picture, to Simon who helped me hang, and to all of the photographers whose work is in the show (especially Kate and Anabela who came a LONG way to be there). This has been the most insane learning curve for me, ridiculously challenging but really, really fun.

I’m still toying with the idea of selling prints of all the work to you guys but I’ll have more information about that soon. In the meantime, the show will be open until May 18th and there are still a few things left for sale.

Now, I’m going to take a few days off to breathe.

Other People’s Houses: Brian W. Ferry

Brian Ferry blogs over at the blue hour. He’s also taken photos for Albam and Ralph Lauren, and he’s the tenth photographer taking part in Other People’s Houses.

Where are you from and where do you live now?
I am from the US – I grew up in Connecticut (where my family still lives).  I currently live in London, and before that I lived in Brooklyn, NY.  I’ll be moving back to Brooklyn at the end of 2011.

Where is home for you and why do you live there?
My physical home is a flat in London.  I work for an American company and I moved to London to work in their office here.  I’ve been here for almost a year and half, and it’s been a very, very good experience for me.  My flat is near the Regent’s Canal in Islington, close to the Hackney side.  I live in this area for a few reasons, but mostly because I prefer east London.  There is a real sense of character here, it feels accessible and interesting and I’m inspired constantly.  Plus, I can walk to work in the City in about 20 minutes … my morning walk has become really important to me.

If I had to choose my spiritual home though, I would say the US – my closest friends and my family are there, and no matter how far I move away, I still feel very rooted to the east coast and NYC/Connecticut.  At the end of this year, I’ll go back to NYC and I’m looking forward to it.

Describe your home.
I live in a terraced house that was built in 1850 or thereabouts.  By far, it is my favorite place I’ve rented over the years.  My flat gets plenty of natural light all day long (which is important in London, given how grey and dark it can be!).  It also has ample space for me and my stuff and a great kitchen (I spend a lot of time in the kitchen).  It has such great character – original molding along the ceilings, old casement windows, Victorian shutters, and wide plank wooden floors in certain rooms.  I don’t like living in high-rises or new developments, and so this place is perfect for me.  Even more importantly (putting aside its physical attributes), my home feels good to me – comfortable, a place where I can relax, cook, work on photographs, daydream, etc.  At the end of a long day, I am always happy to go home.

How did you approach your photos for the exhibition?
I wanted to do something different for the exhibition.   I thought about “home” and what it means to me.  I’m very conscious of the stuff that I surround myself with – and I try to have things around me that make me feel good and reflect my personality and interests.  No matter where I live – various flats and apartments, different countries, different cities & neighborhoods – there are certain items and things that symbolize “home” to me – things I’ve collected along the way that help create a “home” wherever I am.  So I took photos of some of these things outside of their natural environment, as if I were taking inventory and about to box the items up and move somewhere else.  No matter where they live, they have come to represent “home.”

Other People’s Houses opens TONIGHT at CAMP London.

Other People’s Houses: Hilda Grahnat

The next OPH photographer I’m featuring is the mad talented Hilda Grahnat. She lives in Malmo, Sweden.

Where are you from and where do you live now?
I am from the small town Nässjö in the deep forests of Småland, Sweden and currently live in Malmö, the third biggest city in Sweden.

Where is home for you and why do you live there?
I live in a 39 sqm apartment eight floors up in the air. I had a lot of trouble finding an apartment when I moved to Malmö, and finally found this one just two weeks before I moved. It’s my very first apartment and I have spent the 1.5 years I have lived here lovingly decorating and redecorating it a million times.

Describe your home.
My home is filled with flea market treasures that I thought were too precious to be forgotten. I collect everything from old cameras and books to glasses and frames. And I took over my grandfather’s clock collection, which I now proudly display spread over several places in the apartment. My favorite feature in the apartment is the afternoon light in the kitchen. During the dark winter months, when the sun is a very rare visitor, I am lucky if a thin ray of sunlight manages to reach across the vintage tins on the kitchen shelf. Now, when spring is finally here, the entire kitchen bathes in golden light every afternoon.

How did you approach your photos for the exhibition?
I thrive when I’m surrounded by things I love and things that inspire me. In my apartment, it’s all about the details and the light, and that’s what I tried to capture.

Other People’s Houses is a photographic exploration of the places we choose to live. It opens at CAMP London this Thursday with a special opening night party.

Other People’s Houses: Jacinta Moore

Jacinta and I have history. I saw her photos and fell in love and wrote to her to tell her so. Then we realised we had mutual friends. Then we realised we’d actually met, six years ago when she showed up – with a plate of brownies and cute shows – to a fundraising event I helped organised. I’m so honoured she’s part of this crew.

Where are you from and where do you live now?
I live in Melbourne, Australia but grew up in Geelong, a much smaller city a little way from here. I moved to Brisbane when I was 20, then settled in Melbourne two years later (six years ago), with a six month stint living in The Netherlands last year.

Where is home for you and why do you live there?
I’ve just recently moved to a leafy inner-suburb with two housemates, two dogs and a cat. Our house is a small Victorian era townhouse with a little courtyard garden so things can get pretty squishy around here, but there are plenty of nice parks, cafes and shops nearby to get us out of the house. Though I often imagine running off somewhere far away, life here suits me well enough for now. Besides, Melbourne really is the best!

Describe your home.
Moving house too many times over these past few years, I have learnt the basics needed to quickly make a home for myself, and am slowly eliminating all the unnecessary extras. My space here is very much a reflection of those needs- plenty of sunlight, plants, white walls, my puppy, room enough to grow some veges, an oven, a comfortable bed, and not too much else. Structurally my room is a little rough, but I love it here nonetheless, now that I’ve got those basics covered.

How did you approach taking photos for the exhibition?
I will often watch and follow the pattern of water stain along my bedroom curtains edge; thinking how lovely are those cordillera cast. It feels as though this place has a secret life of its own, so I tried to capture some sense of this for the exhibition. Stained sheets, cracked walls and creeping vines – everything silently moving, despite me.

Other People’s Houses opens in two days! YIKES! Come and see us!

Other People’s Houses: Michelle Gow

Michelle’s photos constantly take my breath away. If I only buy one photo from my own exhibition (let’s face it, I want about 12 of them), it’ll be one of hers.

Where are you from and where do you live now?
I’m from Victoria, Canada and live in Phuket, Thailand.

Where is home for you and why do you live there?
For the next four or five months, Phuket is home. My parents have lived here for over ten years and I went to high school here, so although I’m not Thai it’s always easy to fall back into step with island life. I’m staying here while I write my thesis, which I started last year in South Africa.

Describe your home
My nickname for Phuket is ‘Pirate Island’, for its mild, everyday chaos, tropical climate and the local fondness for drink. Everything takes longer and nothing really works the way it’s supposed to, but after a while you appreciate this too. Smells are stronger than in Western countries—the streets are a mix of heavy humidity, dried squid, trash, traffic and street food, and in the evenings jasmine mingles with smoke. The golden hour around six is best enjoyed outside, where you can walk past rubber plantations and listen to the call to prayer from the mosque down the road. The rain is warm and there is always, always a major construction project in the works, even as vines creep over dozens of abandoned developments.

How did you approach taking photos for the exhibition?
I don’t feel a strong connection with my parents’ home or the little apartment I’m staying in, so I looked outside for details that felt familiar and particular to Phuket. I walked with my dogs through nearby fields, many of which are now being cleared for residential developments. I visited a few of my favourite Thai houses in nearby villages, the ones I’d been meaning to photograph for years. A friend and I wandered through Phuket Town, into courtyards and down market alleys. Before leaving Cape Town, I also visited a dear friend’s family farm in Limpopo and took some photos there. She played an essential part in making South Africa home for me, so it was lovely to see her childhood haunts and understand her a little better.

Other People’s Houses is a photographic exploration of the places we choose to live. It opens this Thursday (5th May) and runs for two weeks at CAMP.

Other People’s Houses: Ebony Bizys


Other People’s Houses is a photographic exploration of the places we choose to live. The lovely Ebony of Hello Sandwich lives in Tokyo.

Where are you from and where do you live now?
I am originally from Sydney, but currently living in Tokyo. I first became interested in Japan in 1998 when United Colours of Beneton released a ‘fruits’ style catalogue of Japanese street fashion. I recall being amazed with the creativity and uniqueness of the Japanese aesthetic and desperately wanted to travel to Japan and witness at first hand this quirky style. At that time two of my friends were living in Tokyo, so it wasn’t long before I took my first QF21 flight bound for Narita and the rest is history.

Where is home for you and why do you live there?
I live in a buzzy little neighbourhood called Shimokitazawa. It’s 4 minutes by train (and 20 minutes by mamachari) to Shibuya so quite centrally located.

Describe your home.
Shimokitazawa has many vintage clothing stores, cute cafes, bars, live houses and has an overall friendly neighbourhood feeling. It’s the sort of suburb where anything goes, so as a foreigner I feel less out of place.

How did you approach taking photos for the exhibition?
I wanted to capture the quirky little pockets of Tokyo. The small things that make it so special. I am forever walking around my new hometown smiling at the sometimes unnoticed everyday…the way the snow forms shapes in the playground, the pattern on an Okonomiyaki (Japanese pancake) shop owners apron. As a foreigner in Tokyo, these are interesting for me.

Other People’s Houses opens on May 5th at CAMP London. We’re having a little party on opening night and you’re all invited. Please come and say hi!!

Other People’s Houses: Pia Jane Bijkerk

We’re exactly a week away from the opening of Other People’s Houses and every time I think about it, I break into a cold sweat. I’ve been super busy printing and framing this week. Only eight to go! I’m so excited! Right, today’s featured photographer is the talented and super sweet Pia Jane Bijkerk.

Where are you from and where do you live now?
I’m from Sydney, and after 4 years of living in Europe, I’ve just moved back to Sydney.

Where is home for you and why do you live there?
Home for me is not a place – it’s how I feel, how my heart feels. So wherever my heart is, then that is home.

Describe your home.
We’ve just moved into a 3-bedroom workers cottage in a lovely city suburb called Lilyfield. I love the old wooden floorboards, I love the white wood-panelled walls, I love the fireplaces and I love the sound of the birds in the trees in the backyard. It’s a house with history, and I love that too.

How did you approach taking photos for the exhibition?
For me home can be found in the details – the places in my abode where my heart lingers – quiet, dark corners, empty boxes, and door frames. At the moment I feel very much in between places of residence, having just moved from Amsterdam to Sydney. So strong visual memories of my life in Amsterdam exist within the physical space I now occupy.

Other People’s Houses opens next Thursday 5th May at CAMP and runs for two weeks. Come down and see us on opening night!

 

Other People’s Houses: Anabela Carneiro

Lovely Anabela from fieldguided is up next.

Where are you from and where do you live now?
I am from Toronto and I still live in Toronto. When I was younger I thought that there was no way that I would live here as an adult, but the opportunity to leave never really came up. Besides, I knew that it was home years ago as I drove back from New York City and burst into tears at the sight of the Toronto skyline looming in front of me. I do spend the winters wishing I lived in Spain, though.

Where is home for you and why do you live there?
I live in an apartment with my fiance Geoff, and our two cats. It’s the top floor of a house; the house backs onto a small city park. We chose this neighbourhood because it’s a short walk, bike ride or a streetcar trip away from many of our favourite places, and because we really like the general feel of it. It sometimes feels like a busy big city, and sometimes feels like a small town. I can dash over a block or two to get a sandwich and a coffee and run into someone I know.

Describe your home for me.
The apartment is bright and airy. Most of the walls are off-white, and we’ve filled it with the white furniture that we have accumulated over time. Geoff and I haven’t spent too much time renovating it, and we probably won’t, because we’re not too interested in that. Because it’s a rental, it will probably always feel temporary, even if we’re still here in ten years’ time. It’s very modest, but it’s comfortable. We’ve filled the apartment with things that we love, such as little trinkets and lots of books. It has atrocious linoleum floors, so we have a large collection of rugs. I love the light best of all. In spring and summer in the late afternoon our bedroom is filled with such beautiful light that I spend hours staring at the gauzy curtains blowing in the breeze, listening to kids playing in the park, and eating ice cream in bed.

How did you approach taking photos for the exhibition?
For the exhibition I tried to show my home as it is most of the time: a quiet, calm, and occasionally messy place. Sometimes there are piles of clothing on my dresser, but sometimes a pleated skirt can look almost sculptural, and the colours in the pile can be pleasing. For me, home is where my stuff is, so there are many pictures of my stuff, such as my clothing rack or the roses I brought home one day and laid out, or all the silly cat things I own. Home is also where Geoff is, so it was important to me that he make an appearance or two. I also got a bit wrapped up in the idea of voyeurism so I played with taking pictures through doorways or using mirrors.

Other People’s Houses opens on 5th May at CAMP here in London. Please come and see us!

 

Other People’s Houses: Victoria Hannan

In the lead up to the exhibition (it opens a week on Thursday!), I’ve been asking all the photographers some questions about what home means to them. Yesterday we had the lovely Kate Miss. Today, it’s my turn.

Where are you from and where do you live now?
I was born in Adelaide, Australia where I lived until I was 20. Then I lived in Brisbane before moving to Manchester. I’ve been in London for three and a half years now.

Where is home for you and why do you live there?
I spent a month in Australia over Christmas and while it felt easy to be there, I craved and missed the life I’d made in London. So I guess I have two homes. There’s the one I grew up in, the one where my family is, the easy option. And then there’s London: a place where it’s not unusual for me to feel alone, challenged, inspired, frustrated and in love, all in one day. Where your mood can be turned on its head by the tiniest of things, where it feels as though anything is possible

Describe your home.
I live in a big house in De Beauvoir Town, a sweet little area in Dalston. My house is beautiful. There are original Victorian windows, a sprawling garden that’s home to a fox, and some of the warmest, smartest, most interesting people you’ll ever meet. The house isn’t ours, most of the furniture isn’t either. But the feeling I get when I come home is  exactly as I want it.

How did you approach your photos for the exhibition?
I had ideas but the minute I saw the way the evening light was dancing across the walls, the lines and shapes and shadows it made, everything changed and I spent two days chasing the light around the house.

Other People’s Houses opens on 5th May at CAMP here in London. Please come along, we’d love to see you.

Other People’s Houses: Kate Miss

In the lead up to the exhibition (it opens a week on Thursday!), I’ve been asking all the photographers some questions about what home means to them. First up, Kate Miss.

Where are you from and where do you live now?
I’m from a small town outside of Seattle, Washington and I currently live in Venice, California.

Where is home for you and why do you live there?
Four months ago my boyfriend and I moved from New York City to Los Angeles after five years of deciding whether or not NYC was home for me or not. We moved in search of sunshine, a slower pace, a new adventure, and a return to the West Coast, where I do feel most at home. I’m subletting an apartment til the summer by the beach in Venice, and it doesn’t exactly feel like home to me as I’ve realized the neighborhood is not for me. I’m currently deciding what home is to me – is it a physical place, or a feeling? I’m also decided where we’ll move next in Los Angeles, a vast and sprawling place with so many choices of where to live. We have to constantly remind ourselves to stop comparing LA with New York, because it’s so different it’s almost mind bending some days. You have to learn to appreciate the aspects of it that you can’t find in New York, and that makes missing New York easier to deal with, and sometimes, non existent.

Describe your home.
We moved across the country shipping 20 small boxes and stuffing what could fit in the back seat and trunk of our car, to a furnished sublet. So while the furniture is not mine and is not what I’d put in it, the bones of the apartment are great. It has a definite beach house feel – very white washed and huge bay windows – a place you’d probably never find in NYC. It’s a pretty large studio with a funny little loft that only a short person like myself can stand all the way up in, and it gets amazing light. You can see the ocean and palm trees on the beach from our front window, which also means that you can see and hear all the crazy, insane people on the Venice boardwalk. My favorite part of the apartment is the plant shelves we built in front of the bay windows and stuffed with plants. My least favorite thing is how insane and loud the beach is, especially on the weekends.

How did you approach your photos for the exhibition?
Because my apartment is full of furniture that isn’t mine and I’ve held off decorating it exactly the way I’d have it due to it being temporary, I decided to photograph small moments in my apartment as well as a few of the neighborhood. As crazy and annoying as Venice can be, it’s a beautiful neighborhood and so unique. The pedestrian-only walk streets, the ocean, the canals – they’re breathtaking to me. So I photographed what I love: quiet moments. The ocean waves, a walk street after the rain, my laundry drying in front of the bay windows, my cat sleeping, and my favorite photo – an accidental triple exposure of the beach and two views of LA from the Getty museum. Anyone who says LA is ugly hasn’t been where I’ve been.

Other People’s Houses opens on 5th May at CAMP here in London. Please come along, we’d love to see you.